1940s A Walk in the Sun (1945)

Published on July 19th, 2007 | by Chris

1

A Walk in the Sun (1945)


Reviewed by:
Rating:
2
On July 19, 2007
Last modified:October 8, 2012

Summary:

I went into this picture expecting a lot more from the ratings and reviews I read. I suppose in an academic sense its a good picture with a good message, but from the outset its such a downer

A Walk in the Sun (1945)Man, I can honestly say I've just seen the most bleak, dark, depressing, demoralizing... and downright dull war movie I've seen to date....

A Walk in the Sun follows a squad of soldiers as they land on a beach in Italy, and proceed to an occupied farmhouse in a quest to blow up a bridge.  Of course since their Lieutenant's dead, it seems they have to figure that out for themselves.

Of course they have to walk to get there.  And that's about all this movie is about, walking, and talking.  There is endless talk, most of it is the kind of soliloquy and chatter that might've read well on paper, but translates into pretentious pontification on the screen.  Talk, talk, talk.  Some of the most depressing and cynical you'll hear.  It starts off that way, it ends that way.

Oh sure there are a couple of (very!) brief moments where they get shot at, and somebody dies, but then it goes right back to more of the same.  Sure that's probably part of the goal of the picture, to portray the "hurry up and wait" and "nobody knows what's happening" aspects of going to war that are faced.  But it just doesn't make for a good picture.

Add to that the cheesy and sappy "soundtrack" if you want to call it that, with some vibrato tenor singing a overly pretentious song about "a walk in the sun."  Ick.

Interestingly, it seems that in 1945, "loving" was a perfectly acceptable replacement for "f--king" where the Hayes Office is concerned.  At least in this picture.  Kind of funny in a way.  "This loving war."  "My loving gun." Etc, etc.

I went into this picture expecting a lot more from the ratings and reviews I read.  I suppose in an academic sense its a good picture with a good message, but from the outset its such a downer I recommend to spend your time elsewhere....

A Walk in the Sun is directed by "All Quiet on the Western Front" and "Halls of Montezuma" helmsman Lewis Milestone.  It's interesting to compare this picture with "Halls" as a lot of the same themes are presented, but "Halls" is just a much better picture on so many levels it isn't even comparable.

Starring are Dana Andrews, John Ireland, Lloyd Bridges, George Tyne, Huntz Hall and Richard Conte.

B00006L90X is not a valid value for ItemId. Please change this value and retry your request.
A Walk in the Sun (1945) Chris

Summary: I went into this picture expecting a lot more from the ratings and reviews I read. I suppose in an academic sense its a good picture with a good message, but from the outset its such a downer

2.1


User Rating: 0 (0 votes)


About the Author

I've been watching war movies for probably 25 years now. Since December 2006 I've been sharing my habit and passion for these movies here on this site.



One Response to A Walk in the Sun (1945)

  1. warmoviebuff says:

    I hate to disagree with you, but you are wrong on this one. I do agree about the sappy narration and song (why do 1940s war pictures insist on having songs?). However, the rest of the movie is fine. It is realistic in that not much happens on a typical day. Isn’t there room for a war movie that is not nonstop action? What do you think soldiers do when they are resting or waiting for orders? Sit there and stare at each other? The dialogue rings true (other than the cleaning up). I found much of it amusing. It even has a realistic case of battle fatigue. It builds up to a realistic small unit assault which is true to WWII American tactics. Finally, you need to reconsider saying “Halls of Montezuma” is a better movie. That is hard to defend.

Leave a Reply

Back to Top ↑
  • Archives

  • Subscribe via E-mail!

    Get notifications, exclusive contests and offers, and more!
    * = required field
  • More War Movies

  • Large Association of Movie Blogs
  • Recent Comments

  • Facebook